Writing Tip: Repetition in Poetry

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There are many ways to use repetition in poetry. Each type of repetition can have a different impact on the way that your writing sounds and have a different effect on your readers. It can help writers to list for effect and emphasise particular words, emotions or phrases within your poetry. Let’s look at some different ways to use repetition.

Anaphora

This is the repetition of a word or a phrase at the beginning of a clause.
“We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills, we shall never surrender.” – Winston Churchill

Epistrophe

Similar to anaphora, this is the repetition of a word or a phrase at the end of a clause.
“Where now? Who now? When now?” – The Unnamable, Samuel Beckett

Epizeuxis

This is the repetition of the same word or phrase in succession.
“Alone, alone, all, all alone,
Alone on a wide, wide sea”
– The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Anadiplosis

This is the repetition of the last word of a clause as the first word of the next clause.
“This, it seemed to him, was the end, the end of a world as he had known it…” – James Oliver Curwood

Written by: Laura Clark

* Laura is a 23 year old English woman with a history degree residing in the UK. She has been writing for many years and enjoys writing horror/fantasy stories, as well as poetry. You can view her work at: https://inspiredstoriesandpoems.wordpress.com/

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Photo Credit: © Donna J. Sanders



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